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ABOUT US
WHAT WE DO
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Home About Us WHAT WE DO
WHAT WE DO
KIN Consulting Group is a close-knit network of former and current journalists, attorneys, academics, corporate managers, entrepreneurs, professionals and public servants.

We specialize in providing consulting services to facilitate business between the United States and Korea. Since 2001, we have been guiding clients through the process of entry into the Korean market. We have built an extensive international network of Korea-savvy experts and professionals entrenched in their respective fields.
With our network of consultants across a wide range of industries, KIN Consulting Group can provide assistance in researching the market, identifying opportunities and potential threats, setting up a presence in Korea, and with logistics and communications issues.

Through our network's knowledge base and quality access in industries such as law, pharmaceuticals, information technology, government, sports, media and publishing, we can provide invaluable assistance to small- to midsize US companies seeking to enter the Korean market. Whether your company is looking to sell or distribute in Korea, buy in Korea, produce in Korea, or invest or partner in Korea, contacting us early in the process could end up saving you a significant amount of time and money.

Our knowledge of Korea runs wide and deep. We help you access opportunities and resources, assess risks, and navigate the business culture in Korea. To succeed in business with Korea and avoid costly mistakes, the first thing you need to know is that Korea is not China or Japan. If your goal is long-term success in Korea, you need more than an “Asia specialist” to guide the way. You need Korea specialists.

Being successful in Korea takes much more than simply hiring local Koreans. There is a plethora of complex issues to deal with, and you need guidance from experts who know the landscape. In the long run, not appropriately responding to the context, culture, norms, and expectations could be costly, not just financially, but in terms of stress and productivity of personnel. Many foreign companies venturing into Korea have learned the hard way that employee turnover, poor performance, not to mention tension between you and the clients and/or partners, are often the result of “going it alone.”